MS Trollfjord

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The MS Trollfjord is one of Hurtigruten’s Millennium class ships, launched in 2002, along with her sister ship, the MS Midnatsol. The name Trollfjord is a reference to one of Norway’s most well-known and recognized landmarks, a long straight with a narrow entrance, located near the Lofoten Islands. The ship’s interior decoration theme is inspired by Norway’s spectacular coastline, with lots of local stone and wood, giving it a cosy feeling that makes this small ship feel intimate and comfortable. The MS Trollfjord provides interior and exterior cabins, as well as two suite options.

The Trollfjord itinerary involves cruising almost all of Norway’s stunning coastline, from Bergen in the south, to Kirkenes in the far north. The one-way voyage from south to north, or vice versa, is a trip of up to six nights, while the entire round trip is of 11 night’s duration. Like nearly all of the ships in the Hurtigruten fleet, the MS Trollfjord is a working cargo and ferry, in addition to being a passenger cruise ship, and in her capacity as a cargo ship, she visits nearly three dozen port cities and towns in a round-trip voyage from Bergen to Kirkenes and back again. The round trip is organized so that passengers can see and visit a different set of ports on each of the two legs of the journey, so there’s always something new to see and do, every day of the cruise.

The dining on board the MS Trollfjord is a little different from what you’d expect on larger commercial cruises, but you’ll find the food is absolutely delicious, cooked and presented to a high standard by chefs who put plenty of thought into their menus. Breakfast and lunch are both served buffet style, in the passenger’s dining room, called Saga Hall. The breakfast menu is extensive, and includes cereal, fruit, and yogurt, bread, traditional Scandinavian breakfast fish, and international fare such as eggs and sausage. Lunch provides a similarly broad range, with breads, cheeses, and meats, salads, and hot dishes.

Evening meals vary depending on the season and the ship’s current location—with so many port stops each day, Hurtigruten chefs use plenty of fresh local seafood, meats, and produce. Enjoy fresh salads and hot soups, and main courses such as baked trout, reindeer steak, or succulent beef or lamb, followed by a decadent dessert such as strudel, chocolate fondant, or fresh fruit with rich cream.

On Hurtigruten cruises, your focus isn’t on filling every second of the day with ship-board activities—the main focus of these cruises is the spectacular Norwegian coastline, and the interest provided at each port visit and excursion. The excursions themselves are memorable, with opportunities for activities such as dog-sledding, horseback riding, ice-fishing, and snowmobiling, as well as guided tours of port towns, and visits to fishing villages in the Lofoten islands.

The amenities are limited, but there are sauna facilities, a fitness room, and an outdoor Jacuzzi. For most people, however, the most enjoyable ship-board activities are those that involve admiring the incredible views that are a constant part of the experience. There’s also a small internet café, and a library, for passengers’ use, and evenings are often filled with live music, after-dinner drinks and conversation, and the occasional lecture on aspects of Norway’s natural history.